From Our Soundbooth | August 21, 2018

This week we are so delighted to be able to share with you the sound project that was selected as our 2018 Miller Audio Prize Runner-Up in Humor: “Black Folks Ain’t Always Late” by Jonathan Samuel Eddie. 2018 Miller Audio Prize Guest Judge Avery Trufelman had this to say about Eddie‘s piece: “It’s not often that a piece of comedy changes your conception of time itself. Jonathan actually made me laugh out loud, and also taught me a lot. It’s also a treat to hear him work the crowd, hear the roars of laughter from the audience, and feel the ambiance of the venue itself.”

Eddie shared with TMR a few of his own words about “Black Folks Ain’t Always Late”:

This poem offers the audience a candid glimpse into the black lived experience, reinforcing that sometimes you have to laugh to keep from crying. “Black Folks Ain’t Always Late” is a creative exploration and testimony to the necessity of protest and resistance. Humor only serving as a threshhold for dialogue, reflection, and action. This poem is brought to you by black joy having been here before and the beautiful remnants she’s left behind. 

Jonathan Samuel Eddie is a native of Columbus, Georgia and graduate of Georgia Southern University. He represented the city of Atlanta at the National Poetry Slam competition in 2012, 2014, and 2015.  He was also the 2012 and 2014 Grand Slam Champion at Art Amok Atlanta. This spoken word comedian has opened up for the comedic powerhouses such as Bruce Bruce and Earthquake, and was a featured stand up comic at the 2014 Black Box Comedy Festival in Atlanta, GA. His poetry has been featured on the digital platforms of Write About Now, The Root, and All Def Poetry. This teaching artist also serves as executive director of The Fountain City Teen Poetry Slam and travels the country leading poetry workshops and performing his original work. He most recently penned and staged a one man show, Journey Here, which candidly chronicled his time as caregiver for his mother, whom was living with Alzheimer’s. He also published a chapbook of his work entitled “A Whole Notha Kinda Missing” that is available on Amazon.

Listen to Jonathan Samuel Eddie‘s “Black Folks Ain’t Always Late” below:

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