ISSUES | fall 1993

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16.2 (Fall 1993): "Crime"

Featuring work by Michael Beres, Richard Dokey, Gary Fincke, Lola Haskins, Linda Hogan, Lisa Knopp David Romtvedt, Carl Schiffman, Carolyn A. Wexler, an interview with James Crumley, selections from the unpublished letters of Henry James, and history as literature from Timothy Gilfoyle.

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CONTENT FROM THIS ISSUE

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History as Literature

Jun 01 1993

A Pickpocket's Tale: The Autobiography of George Appo

George Appo was no ordinary criminal. Forgotten by the time of his death in 1930, Appo was a quintessential underworld celebrity in nineteenth-century New York City. He grew up in poverty, supported himself by picking pockets, became an opium addict, engaged in counterfeiting schemes, and was incarcerated for over a decade in five different prisons. In 1894, his tales of police corruption before an investigative committee generated not only front-page attention in the penny press, but earned him hatred int he underworld. Perhaps most extraordinary, George Appo wrote an autobiography.

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Foreword

Jun 01 1993

Foreword

If you think the streets are sordid and unsafe in 1993, read Timothy Gilfoyle’s recent book City of Eros: New York City, Prostitution, and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790-1920. It describes in stunning detail the sex-and crim-saturated streets of New York, particularly during the nineteenth centruy. In this issue, Professor Gilfoyle edits a memoir by George Appo, pickpocket, “green-good” con artist, and opium addict during one of the earliest American drug scenes.

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Nonfiction

Jun 01 1993

Summer Reading

During my twelfth summer, each excursion I made into the world of adults was followed by an even deeper retreat into myself. Learning about sex was one of those excursions. It began following a Little League baseball game, during which my brother, Jamie, sat on the bench while I sat beneath a tree with my nose in a book–as it would be most of the summer. Joy Adamson’s Born Free and Carson McCullers’ A Member of the Wedding interested me much more than baseball.