ISSUES | fall 2009

32.3 Cover

32.3 (Fall 2009): "Demons"

Featuring work by Traci Brimhall, Lucy Ferriss, Karl Taro Greenfeld,  Roberta Kalechofsky, Sally Keith, Eleanor Lerman, Kent Nelson, Jeffrey Schultz, Brian Swann, Ron Tanner and an interview with Aleksandar Hemon.

CONTENT FROM THIS ISSUE

32.3 Cover

Fiction

Sep 01 2009

Toddy M.

We emerged from the dense flora, came around a bend as the road grew smoother, swung downhill toward the Indian Ocean and saw this naked foreign man surfing the inside of a perfect right-hand point break. He was moving left to right in front of me, gliding down the face of a powerful, beautifully formed cylinder of water. He stood more upright on the yellow surfboard than I would have imagined possible, his stance surprisingly sturdy-looking in spite of, or perhaps because of, his nudity.

32.3 Cover

Fiction

Sep 01 2009

The Path of the Left Hand

Globe wasn’t cold in winter, but there were months of less light and more darkness. In other years he’d played tennis, hiked in the mountains and increased his minutes on the stair-step machine, but that December and January he responded as if he were in a state of dormancy, like the fish in Queen Creek that lowered their body temperatures or the snakes that stayed in burrows for days at a time. He rarely went to the gym or the club. He watched television dramas and read English sea novels, and when Julia offered to host a party or they were invited somewhere, he begged off.

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Foreword

Sep 01 2009

Demons

Cheever’s life suggests how often not just writers but most of us suffer from demons. Whether or not they are as dramatic as Cheever’s, they can be both commonplace and cumbersome in our lives. The modern word “demon” comes from a proto-European term for “god” or “celestial,” yet its different usages over time refer to a variety of hidden powers or forces, from the higher self of Greek philosophy to the destructive demons of medieval Christianity. For Freud, demons were impulses arising from repression. Modern philosophers use the term “Morton’s demon” to describe our surprisingly frequent tendency not to see what belies our currently held biases.