Miller Aud-cast Episode 27

Hello everybody, we’re back with the 27th episode of the Miller Aud-cast. It’s an honor today to present the latest finalist in the Poetry category for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize, “introDICTION,” from Angela Kariotis.

Angela Kariotis is a creative, a thought leader, and a divergent thinker. Her varied experience makes her unique and nimble. She is an advocate, educator, artist, and a project director.

Angela is a future aesthetics performance artist writing about race, ethnicity, and class in America. Called “a lithe and vital writer-performer” by The Star-Ledger, Angela Kariotis “possesses the raw energy to light up a small city” heralds The Chicago Reader. “But it’s her sly and engaging use of language that makes her work memorable in dynamic performances that are serious and seriously funny” writes the Austin Chronicle.

As a presented and commissioned artist, Angela has brought her unique performance style across America and beyond to venues such as The University of California-Los Angeles, Contact Theater in Manchester, UK, Legion Arts in Iowa, the Off-Center in Austin, TX, the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, and the Hip Hop Theater Festival in New York City. With its deft balance of narrative, critique, and movement, as well as Angela’s visceral and fluid performance, her work has connected with audiences across the U.S. “A one-woman artistic showcase in her trail-blazing storytelling.” –Los Angeles City Beat.

Winner of a NJSCA Playwriting Fellowship and National Performance Network Creation Fund Awards, Angela couples her masterful performances with cutting-edge residency work. A master teaching artist for 20 years, Kariotis is committed to literacy through the arts, theater for social justice, and art-making as a liberatory practice. For her classroom teaching, Kariotis integrates contemplative learning, and restorative circles into her pedagogy. Her work is hyper focused on classroom inclusivity and active learning. Kariotis facilitates strategies to create an equitable classroom and to support co-intentional teaching with an empowered and diverse student cohort.

Learn more at her website: angelakariotis.squarespace.com.

Stay tuned after this ear-bending, mind-delicious piece to hear contest editor Bailey Boyd and I have a brief, admiring conversation about it.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #28, coming soon. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize. Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 25

Hello everybody, we’re back with our 25th episode of the Miller Aud-cast. I continue to be Marc McKee, managing editor of the Missouri Review, and I’m pleased to be here with you, now, in the 4000th Tuesday to take place in the last two years. It’s an honor today to present the latest finalist in the Humor category for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize, “All My Visits to the GAP, in No Particular Order,” from Marissa Castrigno.

Marissa Castrigno lives in Wilmington, North Carolina, where she’s an MFA Candidate in Creative Nonfiction. She reads for Ecotone Magazine and serves as a contributing editor at Shenandoah. Her work has appeared in PANK, Kissing Dynamite, Memoir Mixtapes, Eater NY, and others.

Stay tuned after the piece for a conversation about it between me and contest editor Bailey Boyd.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #25, coming soon. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Don’t forget: we’re accepting entries for the 31st Annual Jeffrey E. Smith Editors’ Prize, and those who submit during the first two weeks in August will be invited to a special virtual Zoom session with the editors later in August or September. Find out more details about the contest here.

Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today!  Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 24

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 24. In this episode, we feature three poems from David Olimpio, a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Poetry.

David Olimpio grew up in Texas, and currently lives and writes in Philadelphia. He is the author of This Is Not a Confession (Awst Press, 2016) and the Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Atticus Review. You can find more about him at davidolimpio.com, including links to his writing and photography. He Tweets and Instagrams as @notsolinear.

From David:

This little triptych of poems sprang forth in quick succession during a period of intense sadness and transformation where I was shedding some old stuff to make way for some new. What all three poems have in common is the theme of divorce and the associated feelings of loss (of love, of life, of identity). One of the poems is about an abortion. Another is about perceptions of self around the concept of masculinity. The pieces are part of a larger collection I am building around these themes. An interesting side note is that each poem also draws inspiration from a particular Mad Men episode. Somehow that show feels deeply important to my life in a way I can’t adequately explain coherently. And maybe that’s what poetry is for: to adequately explain things incoherently.

I’ve never felt satisfied with just the writing of words on paper. I like to accompany text with sounds or images. I’ve long made “photopoems,” [link: davidolimpio.com/category/photoblog/] most of which are actually written by my dogs while I am sleeping, or otherwise unconscious, and then edited by me later. But a new interest of mine is working with audio and video, mixing the written word with those mediums. (Of course I’m kidding about the dogs — they’re also involved in the editing process.)

I tend to hear my poems as I write them, the inflection, the tone, the pauses. For me the aural quality of a poem isn’t an afterthought. It’s more integral to the way I conceive a poem, or even a piece of prose. I’m glad there are projects like the Miller Aud-Cast to showcase audio literary work. It’s really the preferred way I like to share my writing.

Instagram: @notsolinear
Twitter: @notsolinear
Medium: @davidolimpio
Website: davidolimpio.com

Much gratitude to David Olimpio for sharing his poems with us, and for the conversation they inspired.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #25, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest was just extended to June 22. Learn all about it here. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 23

Hello everybody, we’re back with the 23rd Episode of the Miller Aud-cast to share with you all “Love Tunnels,” a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Audio Documentary, written and directed by Malgorzata Zerwe and David Zane Mairowitz.

Here’s what they have to say for themselves:

“We are both radio free-lancers, we’ve worked in and for many countries, separately and together, and we like to keep our microphones open and ready whenever we can. In 2011, we found ourselves on a car trip from Denver to San Francisco, lasting about four weeks, and with a stopover in Las Vegas to “legitimise” (not our word) our relationship. Right away we decided to talk to and record anyone along the way who had anything poignant to say about the marriage ritual, among others a Native American Navajo horse-tamer, Colorado Bible-preachers who wanted to marry us in their hotel, as well as a tour guide in Taos who filled us in on D.H. Lawrence’s stormy marriage there. This became our Radio Road Movie, which includes our recordings in Vegas itself, attacked by wedding sharks on the street and embarrassed by a kitschy wedding sermon conducted at the open window of our muddy rental car. The current piece is a truncated version of a longer feature.”

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #24, coming soon. In the meantime, DO NOT SLEEP: submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Learn all about it at our website. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, who joined me for this Aud-cast, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize. Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 22

Welcome to the Missouri Review’s Miller Aud-cast. This is episode 22, you lovely internet you. Today we’re gorgeously dealing with Daniel Dyer’s “When Staring Into the Horizon’s Headlights,” a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Prose.

Daniel M. Dyer is strikingly handsome, overwhelmingly intelligent, and constantly sarcastic. A California native, he has been published by The Dallas Review, Malibu Magazine and several other publications before he released his debut book, When Did This Bullshit Become Poetry? which charted as an Amazon #1 New Release and best seller. He is the co-founder of the videography company Visual Candy, which he operates alongside his brother. When he’s not hunched over his weathered desk he is most likely taking photos of uncomfortable squirrels, or being loud in otherwise quiet public locations. Above all, he is extremely grateful for this opportunity:

This short story will be included in a book of similarly styled tales. The goal was to make you, the reader, have a good ol’ fashion cry. Or at least crave a good cry. I hope I have accomplished that goal. Thank you so much for giving it your time.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast lucky #23, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15. Learn all about it at our website. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 21

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 21. In this episode, we feature a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Humor, “The Big Sneeze.”

“The Big Sneeze” is a playful collaboration between two Adelaide artists, writer Suzanne Verrall and sound artist and musician Dani Burbrook.

Suzanne wrote the 200 words of “The Big Sneeze” in February 2018. In March of the same year Dani created this recording where she narrates the story, plays a digital double bass, percussion on a pizza box and the “mouth” trumpet – which is actually just her voice. It was published by Meow Meow Pow Pow on their website in early June 2018 and then later featured on Radio Adelaide in an interview with Dani and Suzanne discussing their exhibition “Heart Pieces” which was showing at the Prospect Gallery at the time.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #22, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 20

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 20. In this episode, we feature “Echo Bridge,” a sound poem from Jane P. Perry, a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Perry is an ethnographer. She uses voices and ephemera to tell stories as an author and sound artist. Quoting from Storytelling In Sound, her growing collection of acoustic poems, Jane says, “I believe the auditory sense provides a rich channel for opening the imagination because what is heard can be open to interpretation. The act of interpreting becomes a healthy experience of storytelling for the listener.”

Thanks for being here with us for Miller Aud-cast #20. Much gratitude to Jane P. Perry for sharing her work with us, and letting us give it to the internet: it is an honor.

Find her on social media at the following handles:
Twitter: @oaklandjane
Facebook: jane.perry79462
IG: janepperry

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #21, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15. Learn all about it at our website.

Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: submit your work today.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 19

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 19. In this episode, we feature “Letter to an Israeli Soldier,” by Emily Franklin.

Emily Franklin’s is the author of more than twenty novels. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Guernica, New Ohio Review, Cincinnati Review, Blackbird, EpochThe Rumpus, and Cimarron Review among other places as well as featured on National Public Radio and named notable by the Association of Jewish Libraries. Her debut poetry collection Tell Me How You Got Here was published by Terrapin Books in 2021.

Find her at:

http://www.emilyfranklin.com

Twitter:  @efranklinauthor

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/emily.franklin.528

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #20, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15. Learn all about it at our website. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, intern Olivia Douglas, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: submit your work today!

Miller Aud-cast Episode 16

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 16. In this episode, we feature Marina Favila’s entry, “Holy, Holy,” a finalist in the Humor category for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize.

Marina Favila is Professor of English Emerita at James Madison University. She has published essays on Shakespeare, poetry, and film in academic journals, such as Modern Philology and Texas Studies in Literature and Language. Her published creative work includes pieces in Weirdbook, Wraparound South, and Flame Tree Press’s Haunted House Short Stories anthology.

Here’s what Favila has to say about the piece: “When I told a friend I needed to write artistic notes for “Holy, Holy,” she suggested I address how almost everything that makes us laugh juxtaposes the sacred and the profane. We’re academics by trade, so that sounded like a smart way in. Unfortunately, what I discovered is that any time you try to explain why something’s funny, it ceases to be funny pretty quickly. So . . .

I like Christmas stories. I try to write one every year. Of course, 2020 was pretty harrowing; and along with losing someone I adored, well, it was a crap year. But the person I lost loved to laugh—great, deep, soul-satisfying, belly-in, belly-out laughs. He also trafficked in the sacred and profane, spirit and body, especially the body, and he wasn’t afraid of a good Rabelaisian snort. He loved Shakespeare, too, especially the gravedigger’s scene in Hamlet, with its fall-of-a-sparrow stretch between godlike apprehension and Yorick’s dirty skull. So maybe this story is my way of trying to create a similar stretch for myself: from the grave to the gravedigger’s scene, from mourning to mirth. I wanted to celebrate the union of body and spirit, though I admit my connection is a bit unconventional. Anyway, hope the story makes you laugh. And what the hell, Merry Christmas!”

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #17, coming soon. And don’t forget, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15. Learn all about it at our website. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize. Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! Learn more at www.missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 15

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 15. In this episode, we feature the poet Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie, a notable entry in our 2020 Miller Audio Prize contest.

Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie is a Zambian-Ghanaian poet who grew up in Botswana. She holds an MFA in poetry from the University of Michigan. She is a Hopwood and Meader Family Award winner as well as a finalist of: The Brunel International African Poetry Prize, The Palette Poetry Spotlight Award, The Furious Flower Poetry Prize and Wick Poetry Center’s Peace Poem contest. Akosua has received fellowships from Callaloo and the Watering Hole. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in: Obsidian, Birdcoat Quarterly, Wildness, Bettering American Poetry, WusGood?, and The Felt. She is currently working on her first poetry collection.

In this series of rich, dazzling and evocative poems, Afiriyie-Hwedie strives with fierce and elegant success to articulate the body, to map it onto our moment, and to understand it as “a war,” “an open window, a loosening belt,” a project of construction in resistance to oppressive forces and open to pleasure that should be any body’s birthright. In the conflations of the divine and the gritty beauties of the material world, these poems call us to a higher understanding of ourselves, and of everyone else.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #16, coming soon. And don’t forget, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15.