Miller Aud-cast Episode 51: Jacqueline Guzda

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen to and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Thank you for being here, wherever here is, for episode 51, featuring the latest finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Audio Documentary, “Behind the Curtain: The War for the West,” from Jacqueline Guzda.

Jackie Guzda is an Associate Professor at Western Connecticut State University where she creates Behind the Curtain, an investigative documentary podcast about current and political events. BTC began as a political comedy podcast, evolved into an interview format and finally in its current form. It will someday return to its roots but for now Jackie serves as host of Lifelong Learners, a vlog/podcast in which she interviews amazing movers and shakers in the Educational Technology world.

Learn more about her at LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jacqueline-gu…a-ph-d-ba41a52a/

Episode 52 will be here for you before you know it, so keep a watchful ear and listening eye about you. Thanks as always to the outgoing Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

BE ADVISED: Entries are now open for the second annual Perkoff Prize, the new opportunity from the Missouri Review which awards $3000 + publication in prizes to the poet, fiction writer, and essayist with the best work engaging the fields of health and medicine in provocative ways. Learn more on our website, or subscribe to our newsletter for weekly updates.

As ever, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of marvelous (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 48: Bryce Berkowitz

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen to and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Thank you for being here, wherever here might be, for episode 48, featuring the latest finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Poetry, Bryce Berkowitz’s “Hepburn Manor, Los Angeles.”

Bryce Berkowitz is the author of Bermuda Ferris Wheel, winner of the 42 Miles Press Poetry Award. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Best New Poets, New Poetry from the Midwest, The Sewanee Review, The Missouri Review, Ninth Letter, and other publications. He teaches at Butler University. Currently, he is at work on a novel, a second poetry collection, and several TV pilots.

Here’s what he has to say in his ARTIST’s NOTE:
“I wanted to teach my students how to record podcasts—even though I’d never recorded one myself… A couple friends encouraged me to learn how to use Audacity, a free recording program, before assigning the project—wise words for obvious reasons. Instead of recording a podcast, I recorded this poem then layered some music beneath it. I’ve always read my work out loud whenever I write. There’s no better way to tap into your voice. Recording and listening helps smooth out the edges in the lines. Over 15 years ago, I used to write lyrics, make beats, perform, and record music. So, this process felt familiar, although ancient too. It was a life I’d left behind, despite enjoying it for many years. After putting together this track, I shared it with several friends who still make music, and we’ve discussed collaborating—poems to soundscapes, instrumentals, etc. We’ll see what comes of it. For now, the idea of working with old friends on new projects is exciting, and I’m looking forward to that, and I’m happy to share this piece too.”

“Hepburn Manor, Los Angeles” was originally published in Muzzle Magazine. You can read or follow along here: www.muzzlemagazine.com/bryce-berkowitz.html.

BE ADVISED: Entries are now open for the second annual Perkoff Prize, the new opportunity from the Missouri Review which awards $3000 + publication in prizes to the poet, fiction writer, and essayist with the best work engaging the fields of health and medicine in provocative ways. Learn more on our website, or subscribe to our newsletter for weekly updates.

As ever, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of marvelous (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 45: Julia Tagliere

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen to and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. I’m Marc McKee, TMR’s managing editor. It’s good to have you back, or here for the first time, with episode 45 of the Miller Aud-cast, featuring the latest finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Humor, Julia Tagliere’s “Ithaca Kitty’s Got Beef.”

Julia Tagliere’s work has appeared in The Writer, Potomac Review, Gargoyle Magazine, Washington Independent Review of Books, and numerous anthologies. Winner of the 2015 William Faulkner Literary Competition for Best Short Story, the 2017 Writers Center Undiscovered Voices Fellowship, and the 2021 Nancy Zafris Short Story Fellowship, Julia completed her M.A. in Writing at Johns Hopkins University and serves as an editor with The Baltimore Review. She is currently working on her first story collection, Reliance. and hosts live, bimonthly literary readings through the MoCo Underground Reading Series. Follow her at justscribbling.com.

Here’s what Tagliere has to say in her Artist Note:

When I was a very little girl, our dear, old family friend had an ancient calico cat named Eco, who was the meanest, most wretched creature that ever coughed up a hairball. He liked to hide under the couch and hiss at people all day long, and for some reason, I always thought of him whenever I read Eugene Field’s poem, “The Duel,” which I did a lot back then, because it was in my favorite book of children’s stories. Many, many years later, in 2020, I was researching something completely unrelated for my current collection, Reliance, and stumbled upon the alleged inspiration behind Field’s poem: The Ithaca Kitty, an 1892 plush toy designed by two women, Celia Mattison Smith and Charity Smith, and modeled after Celia’s pet cat: Caesar Grimalkin. It didn’t take long for Eco, Caesar Grimalkin, and Field’s calico cat to join forces and take up an uncomfortable amount of space in my mind–as cats do–and this silly little piece is the result. I had a lot of fun writing it. 

Learn more about Tagliere and her work on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JuliaTagliere.JustScribbling

Twitter: https://twitter.com/juliascribbling

https://www.instagram.com/julia_justscribbling/?hl=en

Keep listening after the piece to hear managing editor Bailey Boyd and I talk about low level mobsters, the voices people imagine for their cats, and how impossible physics plays into the comedic strategies of the piece.

Aud-cast 46 is sneaking up on you, so BE ALERT. As the road warning sign I passed a thousand times in my youth said, “The world needs more lerts.” Thanks as always to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

A quick reminder: TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of marvelous (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website. Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 41: Trevor Stephenson

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen to and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Happy New Year, listeners. May 2022 be recklessly good to you. Let’s start it off with episode 41 of the Miller Aud-cast, featuring the latest finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Prose, “Bittersweet,” from Trevor Stephenson.

Trevor Stephenson is the pen name of Brian Hicks, an enrolled member of the Osage Nation, from the Gentle Peacemaker Clan, with Cherokee and European ancestors. Raised in the shadow of the Osage Hills, born miles from the reservation boundary, Trevor is a recent graduate of the Middlesex University Masters in Novel Writing Program, and a past recipient of The Alumni Scholarship from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He is at work on a novel about a mixed blood Indian dealing with historical and generational trauma. His work addresses what it means to live in the liminal position between American Indian culture and the dominant US society.

The following is from his artist’s note:

Much of my personal story emanates from the domain given to my ancestors by the Creator: this piece is meant to demonstrate respect for the land as well as how our current state of being should be understood in terms of our relation to the physical environment. I believe the land, water, and sky speak for themselves, however, understanding what is being communicated requires dedicated awareness.

Stick around after the piece to hear managing editor Marc McKee and contest editor Bailey Boyd talk about how carefully and poignantly this piece does the work of allowing personal feeling to move into broader and deeper reckoning with history and its distortion and erasure.

Aud-cast 42 is right around the corner, so BE ALERT. Thanks as always to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Can I remind you of something before we go? TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of marvelous (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website. Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 40: Sally Stevens

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen to and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The Aud-cast is back for episode 40, featuring the latest finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Humor, “The Story Lady/Cindarella,” from Sally Stevens.

Sally Stevens works in film and television scoring, sound recordings and concert in the Hollywood music business as a singer/choral director and lyricist. She served as Choral Director for the OSCARS broadcast for 22 years, and her voice can be heard on literally hundreds of film and television scores. She sings the main title for The Simpsons, now in its 32nd year of airing.

Her other passion is writing, and her short stories and poems have been included in Mockingheart Review, Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal, Raven’s Perch, The OffBeat, Funny in Five Hundred, Between the Lines Anthology: Fairy Tales & Folklore Re-imagined, The Los Angeles Press, The Voices Project, and No Extra Words podcast. Had the pandemic not shut them down, this would have been her 22nd summer at the University of Iowa summer writing workshops. She has recently completed a memoir about her journey through the music world of Hollywood, including the touring years in concert with Ray Conniff, Nat King Cole and Burt Bacharach.

She is also a fine art photographer and has had several Black & White Fine Art Photography exhibits in the Los Angeles area. Some of the photos from her series of film composer portraits were included in an exhibit at Cite de la Musique in Paris, in 2013.

Artist Notes:
The notes about this particular material — when I was a kid, I wanted to be another Lucille Ball when I grew up. Life took me in another direction, but I just love doing readings and hearing the audience laughter. This piece was so fun to create, and I’m just thrilled that it will hopefully be enjoyed by folks I would never otherwise have a chance to share it with. My love and thanks to TMR.

Social Handles/Websites:

www.HollywoodFilmChorale.com
www.SallyStevensWriter.com
www.SallyStevensPhotography.com/filmscoring.html

Stick around after the piece to hear managing editor Marc McKee and contest editor Bailey Boyd talk about how the funny unfolds in this clever project.

Aud-cast 41 is on its way soon, so BE ALERT. Thanks as always to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Just as a reminder, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of marvelous (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website. Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 38: Toni Ann Johnson

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen to and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. I’m Marc McKee, managing editor, and the weather on the internet is half a billion dogs, 13 mudslides, 5 of which are on fire, gossip that looks like advertising, and advertising that looks like gossip: hang onto your brollys. Thankfully, the Aud-cast is here for episode 38, featuring the latest finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Prose, “Time Travel,” by Toni Ann Johnson.

Toni Ann Johnson’s short fiction and essays have appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Hunger Mountain, Callaloo, The Emerson Review, Coachella Review, and elsewhere. A novel, Remedy For a Broken Angel was nominated for a 2015 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work by a Debut Author. A novella, Homegoing won Accents Publishing’s inaugural novella contest and was released in May of 2021. A linked story collection, Light Skin Gone to Waste won the 2021 Flannery O’Connor Award for short fiction and is forthcoming from The University of Georgia Press in 2022. “Time Travel” is part of this collection. Johnson was the Humanitas Prize-winning screenwriter of the TV movie Ruby Bridges. She also wrote the second installment of the Step Up dance franchise, Step Up 2: The Streets.

Learn more and follow her on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook:

Social handles:
Twitter handle: @toniannjohnson https://twitter.com/toniannjohnson
Instagram is treeladytoniann https://www.instagram.com/treeladytoniann/
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/toniannjohnson/

Miller Aud-cast Episode 36: Turkeys

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. This is episode 36, featuring the latest finalist for the Miller Audio Prize in Humor. That finalist is “Turkeys,” from the series SAFETY IN THE FIELD, part of a body of short film and audio projects inspired by educational audio-visual material: training films, filmstrips, foreign-language instruction records, etc. This entry comes to us from Christian Baskous, with help from Paul Bates, Sonnie Brown, and Marcos Martinez.

Christian Baskous is an actor, writer and director. His original work for radio has played and been serialized on non-commercial stations across the US and Canada. He’s appeared in motion pictures, plays and on TV and recorded popular audiobook versions of works by Charles Bukowski, Richard Ford, Jim Harrison and others.

Make sure you keep listening after the piece to hear contest editor Bailey Boyd and I talk “Turkeys,” and consider the subtle—and not so subtle—elements that build its comedy. To echo Christian Baskous, thanks for listening!

Aud-cast 37 is on its way soon, so look forward to listening to that in the coming moments. Thanks as always to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Just as a reminder, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of exhilarating (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website. Discover more here.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 35: Gabriela Frank

Hello and welcome to Aud-cast #35, the Missouri Review podcast where we listen and discuss the finalists for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. How lucky for you to be here in this moment, where we can spend some time listening to the latest poetry finalist for the Miller Audio Prize, Gabriela Frank’s “Ode to Loki (or, An Absurd Glorification of Existential Loneliness).” You are in for a treat.

Gabriela Denise Frank is a Pacific Northwest writer, editor, and creative writing instructor. Her work has appeared in True Story, Pembroke, Hunger Mountain, Bayou, Baltimore Review, The Normal School, The Rumpus, and elsewhere. She serves as the creative nonfiction editor for Crab Creek Review. Until February 2021, she had no idea who Tom Hiddleston was. www.gabrieladenisefrank.com

In her note on the piece, Frank has this to say:

This tumble of a poem began with a monthlong subscription to Disney+ in the dark days of February 2021. My husband and I binge-watched The Mandalorian and had twenty-eight days left on our subscription. We scoffed at the Marvel Cinematic Universe—we had only seen Iron Man at that point—because the whole thing seemed super commercial, and there were too many characters to keep straight. By March, we had watched every movie. The development arc of Loki was the most intriguing to me. Who is this Tom Hiddleston guy? Turns out he had been in a lot of movies, and one highly publicized romance with Taylor Swift, which I had completely missed. 

At some point, I realized it was the conflicted character that Hiddleston created rather than the movie star who captured my imagination. Definitely a bad choice for crush. We writers channel a little (or a lot) of ourselves into the characters we create–as do the best actors. Where was the line here between character and actor? Between appearance and truth? A love affair with Loki was bound to end badly, but what sort of person would be drawn to him? We were all stuck inside eating the same meals watching the same shows, and from that notion—the trapped obsessive with nothing but time, imagination, and an internet connection on her hands—an idea was born.

For more, follow Frank on Twitter and Instagram, where her handle is @CivitaVeritas.

Aud-cast 36 is on its way soon, so make sure your ears are on their toes. Thanks as always to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Just as a reminder, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of exhilarating (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website. Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 33: Janet Horvath

Hello and welcome to Aud-cast #33. It’s our pleasure to introduce the latest Audio Documentary finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize, Janet Horvath, with her piece “A Musician Who Can’t Tolerate Sound.”

Janet Horvath, is a lifelong performing classical musician, soloist, author, speaker, and educator. The Minnesota Orchestra’s associate principal cello from 1980 to 2012, she has appeared as soloist with orchestra, and in recital and chamber music throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe.

The author of the award-winning book Playing (Less) Hurt—an Injury Prevention Guide for Musicians, she has worked with instrumentalists to establish a holistic approach: to play with ease and eloquence, while preserving good posture and maintaining comfort.

A pioneer and authority in the area of the medical problems of performing artists and a passionate arts advocate, Janet’s masterclasses and seminars are well-regarded by both amateur and professional musicians, teachers and students, and health care providers. Presentations include for the San Francisco Symphony, Utah Symphony, Indianapolis Symphony, Boston Symphony Orchestra, and at colleges, conservatories, and conferences from coast to coast. She has appeared on the BBC, CBC, and NPR national radio stations and television.

Her Tiny Love Story appeared in the New York Times, May 2021 and she is an audio-documentary finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Contest hosted by the Missouri Review. Recent essays include A Musician Afraid of Sound published in The Atlantic, October 2015, and in national and international music publications—Musical America, Chamber Music America, Strings Magazine, The Brass Herald, and Strad Magazine among others. A contributing writer for the online classical music e-magazine Interlude.HK , she has penned over 300 feature articles about music and musicians.

Through her writing and musical performances, Janet creates restorative conversations, offers spiritual sustenance, and explores music’s life-bringing and healing power. She is currently at work on a memoir to those same ends.

She earned her master’s degree in music performance from Indiana University studying with Janos Starker and completed her MFA in creative writing from Hamline University St Paul, Minnesota.

The following is from her Artist Notes:

Today, ten years after leaving the Minnesota Orchestra, after a devastating hearing injury and enduring the difficult process of recovery, I find myself uniquely prepared for the trials of the last eighteen months. I have already re-invented myself as a writer; I have already lived through isolation and loneliness. If there’s a silver lining to 2020, it’s that we as a society have had a break from our noisy, hectic lives filled with too much sound; that we realize how many professions and businesses can be released from the rigors of in-person, 9:00-5:00 travel during rush hour; that our livelihoods may be malleable and adaptable. Perhaps we have learned to value the quiet and silence we’ve experienced that has allowed us to ruminate and dream. It’s certainly been better for the environment!

Through these troubling times we all have had to avoid loud gatherings, restaurants, sports events, and concerts. I will always protect my hearing. I know only too well how devastating hearing injury can be, which can impede interaction with others and participation in life. I hope my story will encourage others to do the same. 

Make sure to stick around after Horvath’s powerful work of memory to hear contest editor Bailey Boyd and I ruminate and exclaim over it in wonder. And now, “A Musician Who Can’t Tolerate Sound.”

Aud-cast 34 is on its way, so make sure your ears are on their toes. Thanks as always to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Just as a reminder, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! In addition, we have tons of exhilarating (and free!) creative content to read, listen to, and even watch on our website. Learn more at www.missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 32: Brian Beatty

Hello readers, writers, and friends. It’s a chilly and insistently windy day in Columbia, Missouri, and we’d like to welcome you to Aud-cast #32, the latest poetry finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Get acquainted with Brian Beatty, and his stellar, haunting work, “47834.”

Brian Beatty is the author of five poetry collections: Magpies and Crows (Ravenna Press, 2021); Borrowed Trouble (Cholla Needles, 2019); Dust and Stars: Miniatures (Cholla Needles, 2018); Brazil, Indiana: A Folk Poem (Kelsay Books, 2017); and Coyotes I Couldn’t See (Redbird Chapbooks, 2016).

Beatty lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota, where he works as an advertising creative.

Hobo Radio, a spoken-word album of Beatty’s poems featuring original banjo and guitar music by Charlie Parr, was released by Corrector Records in January 2021. The “47834” sequence is culled from Brazil, Indiana and was originally recorded for Hobo Radio.

Look for him on Twitter, where he is known as @brianbeattympls, and once you’ve listened (a few times) to “47834,” do yourself the favor of going back and checking out the other 31 Aud-casts we’ve left for you. We think you’ll appreciate them as a reward to savor as we move through the fall and shore up against whatever this winter’s got in store for us.

Thanks for being here with us for Miller Aud-cast 32. Aud-cast 33 is on its way, so stay alert. Thanks as always to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize. And don’t forget, the Missouri Review is open for submissions year-round. Be heard. Learn more at missourireview.com.