Miller Aud-cast Episode 25

Hello everybody, we’re back with our 25th episode of the Miller Aud-cast. I continue to be Marc McKee, managing editor of the Missouri Review, and I’m pleased to be here with you, now, in the 4000th Tuesday to take place in the last two years. It’s an honor today to present the latest finalist in the Humor category for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize, “All My Visits to the GAP, in No Particular Order,” from Marissa Castrigno.

Marissa Castrigno lives in Wilmington, North Carolina, where she’s an MFA Candidate in Creative Nonfiction. She reads for Ecotone Magazine and serves as a contributing editor at Shenandoah. Her work has appeared in PANK, Kissing Dynamite, Memoir Mixtapes, Eater NY, and others.

Stay tuned after the piece for a conversation about it between me and contest editor Bailey Boyd.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #25, coming soon. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Don’t forget: we’re accepting entries for the 31st Annual Jeffrey E. Smith Editors’ Prize, and those who submit during the first two weeks in August will be invited to a special virtual Zoom session with the editors later in August or September. Find out more details about the contest here.

Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today!  Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 24

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 24. In this episode, we feature three poems from David Olimpio, a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Poetry.

David Olimpio grew up in Texas, and currently lives and writes in Philadelphia. He is the author of This Is Not a Confession (Awst Press, 2016) and the Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Atticus Review. You can find more about him at davidolimpio.com, including links to his writing and photography. He Tweets and Instagrams as @notsolinear.

From David:

This little triptych of poems sprang forth in quick succession during a period of intense sadness and transformation where I was shedding some old stuff to make way for some new. What all three poems have in common is the theme of divorce and the associated feelings of loss (of love, of life, of identity). One of the poems is about an abortion. Another is about perceptions of self around the concept of masculinity. The pieces are part of a larger collection I am building around these themes. An interesting side note is that each poem also draws inspiration from a particular Mad Men episode. Somehow that show feels deeply important to my life in a way I can’t adequately explain coherently. And maybe that’s what poetry is for: to adequately explain things incoherently.

I’ve never felt satisfied with just the writing of words on paper. I like to accompany text with sounds or images. I’ve long made “photopoems,” [link: davidolimpio.com/category/photoblog/] most of which are actually written by my dogs while I am sleeping, or otherwise unconscious, and then edited by me later. But a new interest of mine is working with audio and video, mixing the written word with those mediums. (Of course I’m kidding about the dogs — they’re also involved in the editing process.)

I tend to hear my poems as I write them, the inflection, the tone, the pauses. For me the aural quality of a poem isn’t an afterthought. It’s more integral to the way I conceive a poem, or even a piece of prose. I’m glad there are projects like the Miller Aud-Cast to showcase audio literary work. It’s really the preferred way I like to share my writing.

Instagram: @notsolinear
Twitter: @notsolinear
Medium: @davidolimpio
Website: davidolimpio.com

Much gratitude to David Olimpio for sharing his poems with us, and for the conversation they inspired.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #25, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest was just extended to June 22. Learn all about it here. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 22

Welcome to the Missouri Review’s Miller Aud-cast. This is episode 22, you lovely internet you. Today we’re gorgeously dealing with Daniel Dyer’s “When Staring Into the Horizon’s Headlights,” a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize in Prose.

Daniel M. Dyer is strikingly handsome, overwhelmingly intelligent, and constantly sarcastic. A California native, he has been published by The Dallas Review, Malibu Magazine and several other publications before he released his debut book, When Did This Bullshit Become Poetry? which charted as an Amazon #1 New Release and best seller. He is the co-founder of the videography company Visual Candy, which he operates alongside his brother. When he’s not hunched over his weathered desk he is most likely taking photos of uncomfortable squirrels, or being loud in otherwise quiet public locations. Above all, he is extremely grateful for this opportunity:

This short story will be included in a book of similarly styled tales. The goal was to make you, the reader, have a good ol’ fashion cry. Or at least crave a good cry. I hope I have accomplished that goal. Thank you so much for giving it your time.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast lucky #23, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15. Learn all about it at our website. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 20

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 20. In this episode, we feature “Echo Bridge,” a sound poem from Jane P. Perry, a finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Perry is an ethnographer. She uses voices and ephemera to tell stories as an author and sound artist. Quoting from Storytelling In Sound, her growing collection of acoustic poems, Jane says, “I believe the auditory sense provides a rich channel for opening the imagination because what is heard can be open to interpretation. The act of interpreting becomes a healthy experience of storytelling for the listener.”

Thanks for being here with us for Miller Aud-cast #20. Much gratitude to Jane P. Perry for sharing her work with us, and letting us give it to the internet: it is an honor.

Find her on social media at the following handles:
Twitter: @oaklandjane
Facebook: jane.perry79462
IG: janepperry

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #21, coming soon. We hope you’ve been enjoying the Aud-cast, and remember: if they’ve inspired you to record your own creative work, whether in poetry, prose, humor, or audio documentary, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15. Learn all about it at our website.

Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: submit your work today.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 15

Hello and welcome to Miller Aud-cast, Episode 15. In this episode, we feature the poet Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie, a notable entry in our 2020 Miller Audio Prize contest.

Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie is a Zambian-Ghanaian poet who grew up in Botswana. She holds an MFA in poetry from the University of Michigan. She is a Hopwood and Meader Family Award winner as well as a finalist of: The Brunel International African Poetry Prize, The Palette Poetry Spotlight Award, The Furious Flower Poetry Prize and Wick Poetry Center’s Peace Poem contest. Akosua has received fellowships from Callaloo and the Watering Hole. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in: Obsidian, Birdcoat Quarterly, Wildness, Bettering American Poetry, WusGood?, and The Felt. She is currently working on her first poetry collection.

In this series of rich, dazzling and evocative poems, Afiriyie-Hwedie strives with fierce and elegant success to articulate the body, to map it onto our moment, and to understand it as “a war,” “an open window, a loosening belt,” a project of construction in resistance to oppressive forces and open to pleasure that should be any body’s birthright. In the conflations of the divine and the gritty beauties of the material world, these poems call us to a higher understanding of ourselves, and of everyone else.

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #16, coming soon. And don’t forget, submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. The deadline for this year’s contest is June 15.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 11

Hello and welcome back to the Miller Aud-cast! We have arrived at episode 11, and it is truly something to marvel at: “Adeline’s Gambol,” by actor and playwright Anne Undeland.

Undeland is a playwright whose work has been presented in festivals on the East and West Coasts with her short, “The Kiss,” winning best play at the Ten Minute Play Festival at the West Side Y in New York in 2018. Her full-length play, Lady Randy, was produced by WAM Theatre and performed at Shakespeare & Co in Lenox, MA in 2019. She’s is an active member of Howl Playwrights In Rhinebeck, NY and The Writers’ Rock in NYC and is at work on a new play called Mr. Fullerton (fans of Edith Wharton will recognize the name).

Undeland has this to say about the piece: “Remember that song with the line, ‘you’re my baby, you’re my pet?’ What happens when a woman takes that idea and runs with it, literally? Strap yourselves in for Adeline’s Gambol, a wild chase through the forest deep in Victorian crinolines, frilly bows, and full-throated female rebellion.”

Listeners should note that one of Undeland’s playwriting groups, Howl Playwrights, has posted Adeline’s Gambol on their YouTube page as part of their “First Monday” series. The group used to go to a nifty pub and do live readings of plays we wrote on the first Monday of the month. Alas, the before times. Now, in an effort to continue (at least in spirit), the group posts stuff online. Undeland say, “I went to town with Adeline, learned some Garageband and iMovie, and made a much more produced version with music and pictures.” Check out the links below to bear witness to that town going-to, and to learn more about Undeland.

As always, the Miller Audio Prize is now accepting entries, and we’re hungry for finalists. Learn more at our website, www.missourireview.com.

“Adeline’s Gambol”: www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2jeqF4HXds
www.anneundeland.com/

Miller Aud-cast Episode 10

This episode we feature the first finalist in the audio documentary category for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize, Elizabeth Caldwell, whose piece is entitled “Another Inch.”

Elizabeth Caldwell is an independent audio producer living in Norman, Oklahoma. “Another Inch” got its start in 2019 as a final project for a class. What you will hear is only a small fraction of the hours of tape collected for the story. If you want to hear more of Elizabeth’s work, listen to her podcast Flyover Country. You can also follow her on Twitter (@eliza_well) and Instagram (@el1zabethc).

flyovercountrypodcast.com/

Stay tuned for Miller Aud-cast #11, coming soon. In the meantime, DO NOT SLEEP: submissions are open now for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. Learn all about it at our website. Thanks also to the Missouri Review contest editor, Bailey Boyd, and TMR intern Olivia Douglas who joined me for this Aud-cast, and to Patricia Miller, for her generous support for the Miller Audio Prize. Finally, TMR is open for submissions year-round, and we remain dedicated to discovering and publishing the best contemporary writing in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today! Learn more at www.missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 9

Welcome to Episode nine of the Miller Aud-cast. This episode we feature the first finalist in the humor category for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize. That finalist is “Ambrosia in Correspondence,” by Anya Krawcheck.

Anya Krawcheck is an actor, writer and photographer. A Miami native, she currently lives in the South Bronx. Recent projects were featured in Tribeca Film Festival, Austin Film Festival & Big Apple Film Festival.  Other appearances range from network television, independent film, site-specific immersive theater, and International play festivals. She is currently developing a new web-series about ghosts, friendship and dental hygiene.

Krawcheck has this to say about the piece:  “‘Ambrosia in Correspondence’  is an audio adaptation of the Ambrosia video series (viewable at the included youtube link). The Ambrosia series was developed in Spring of 2020 and was inspired by a family portrait and the discovery of mail-order vampire fangs. Ambrosia’s story is not a story about a speech impediment. It’s a story about being undead, you know?”

Writing, production and sound engineering for “Ambrosia in Correspondence” by Anya Krawcheck and Brian Goodheart. Look for her on Instagram (@kranya), learn more about her at her website, AnyaKrawcheck.com, and check out the links below to her IMDB page and YouTube channel.

IMDB

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm6943859/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Ambrosia Youtube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3bLMwuiXzVl_m1emwlWD5Q

Be heard. Give us the opportunity to discover you: subscribe or submit your work today!  Learn more at missourireview.com.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 8

This episode features our second finalist for the 2021 Miller Audio Prize, the prose entry “Maps and Fires,” by Jared Green, as adapted with Tracy Bull and Nivedhan Singh.

Jared Green is a fiction writer, literary critic, and professor of English literature at Stonehill College. His poetry has appeared in Waccamaw, Tiny Seed, Emergency Index, and the anthology The Art of Living (forthcoming, Poetose Press), and his fiction and critical writing have been published in numerous journals, including Gulf Coast, Quiddity, The Write Launch, New Limestone Review, and Cagibi. He lives in Concord, MA.

Tracy Bull is an illustrator and mother of three. She also happens to be the neighbor of the author and was honored to lend her voice to the narration of “Maps and Fires.”

Nivedhan Singh is a music producer, actor, director, and activist. His most recent work includes: Senior Program Direction with the national music education nonprofit, Notes for Notes, sound design for the award-winning Nashville Repertory Theatre, and audio post-production for film/music with his record label, Bedlam Sound. His short film, “Nivedhan: An Animated Short” (2019) has been featured in academic conferences and educational programs throughout the US. He is the lead singer and founding member of the musical groups Sleep Away Camp and Sex Habits, in addition to self-titled solo releases. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

Be sure to follow Jared on Instagram (@jfgreen71), Facebook (facebook.com/jared.green.9210), and at his website: nomadictext.wordpress.com.

Find more work from Tracy Bull at TracyBull.com and around Concord, MA, where she resides.

As for Nivedhan, more of his work can be found on the Web at www.nivedhansingh.com. All Social media/Music links can found here: linktr.ee/nivedsingh1023.

Miller Aud-cast Episode 6

Hello hello hello and here we are, it’s Episode 6. This episode features “The Distant Sound of Bees,” a collaboration between the poet Molly Bashaw and the saxophonist and composer Johannes.

Molly Bashaw is the author of the poetry collection The Whole Field Still Moving Inside It, published in 2014. Her essays and poetry have appeared in The New Yorker, The New England Review, The Iowa Review, Crazyhorse, and others.  Johannes Liepold is a jazz saxophone player and composer. The text was written by Molly, the sound engineering and production are by Johannes. All sounds and music were written, created, performed and recorded by Molly, Johannes, and the honeybees.

“The Distant Sound of Bees” is a deeply felt reflection on a couple’s efforts to conceive after losing a child. The fruitlessness of these efforts lead them to beekeeping, and the result is a yearning odyssey in Bashaw’s voice, Liepold’s saxophone, and the cloud of buzzing around their hive and the bees’ circuitous forays. The hive itself becomes a material, living presence that contains its own promises and possibilities, and forges connections and reconnections to family and community. In the face of certain want and uncertain outcomes, this attentive and moving piece finds the only resolutions many of us have, in ritual, in family and friends, and “desperate love.” Enjoy.